Utah Department of Corrections

HOPE & CARE

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Mission: The Mission of the HOPE RSAT Program is to Help Offenders Parole Effectively (HOPE) by guiding them toward a life of recovery and right living through the use of a values-based, Therapeutic Community (TC) model of treatment for addictions and criminal thought process. HOPE has opened expansion dormitory sections in the GALE housing unit. These additional TC sections are called "CARE," and use the same treatment curriculum, methods and processes as HOPE. 

CARE stands for "Community-Assisted Recovery Experience (CARE)." HOPE/CARE teaches offenders to live clean, sober, positive and productive lives, and leave prison with confidence in their ability to successfully complete their paroles and go on to live successful, law-abiding, "clean and sober" lives of recovery.

HOPE provides a thorough relapse prevention education to help recovering addicts/offenders live with life-long vigilance about relapse, knowing that a return to substance use, or "relapse," could be right around the corner if they ever let their guard down in the fight against addiction.

Goals:

  • -Develop self-discipline and impulse control.
  • -Develop genuine empathy and compassion for others.
  • -Achieve success and satisfaction in personal and work life.
  • -Become role models for newer residents.
  • -Become responsible and productive members of society.

Slogan"I create how I feel by how I think about the people and events around me. I am the only one who can change the way I feel by changing the way I think." 

Rules & Expectations: 

• A principle and values-based Therapeutic Community, designed to provide offenders a positive peer culture and environment where high standards of morals of "right living," where the learning and living of HOPE/CARE's 25 Core Values are chosen daily over the 23 Character Defects, and  are behaviorally reinforced with privileges, rewards, and recognition, as well as therapeutic consequences. 

• Community-based, experiential substance abuse treatment and behavior modification, promoted through psycho-educational classes, individual and group therapy provided by licensed therapists, examples of program graduate leaders, and a therapeutic milieu or environment. 

• Relapse prevention with an expectation of complete abstinence from abused substances. Personal identification of criminal thinking errors and behavior, along with the development of strategies to self-correct. 

• Residents adhere to program rules related to pro-social behavior patterns (similar to society's expectations), which are adopted and internalized over time. For example: follow instructions, be punctual, maintain appropriate appearance, use proper manners. Residents hold one another accountable by raising awareness through expressing a verbal "concern," for behavior contrary to the program expectations. Peers offer corrective and assertive feedback to maintain a healthy, predictable community which can facilitate personal growth and recovery. Therapeutic Consequences may include "learning experiences," or "image-breakers" which are eight-second, one-person skits, in front of peers. Reports, service hours and loss of program privileges may also be deemed appropriate by staff and peers. 

• No physical violence, or threats or violence are allowed. HOPE residents are carefully screened for participation, based on their offense history, programming needs, and suitability for dorm-style living. Dual-diagnosis offenders are referred to CUCF mental health staff for evaluation and treatment in order to maintain a achieve and maintain a remission of symptoms during their substance abuse treatment. 

• Each resident is expected to participate in psycho-educational life skills classes, followed by group and individual therapy offered by HOPE/CARE licensed therapists.  

• Residents are expected to be the best-behaved and hardest working in the institution. They complete an Intensive Phase (two 2-month terms or track).  If able, an offender may simultaneously earn high school credits in the evening. After the Intensive Phase, some complete Building Trades or Culinary Arts programs through Snow College, or apply to work in various prison jobs. In order to apply for jobs, residents must have a "step three" level in HOPE/CARE, which corresponds with their time in the program and the number of written assignments completed). 

• The first four months of classes are the "Intensive Tracks." These courses are taught by advanced residents in the program and include: Relapse Prevention, Relapse Cycle, Interpersonal Skills, Conflict Resolution Anger Management, Stress Management, Thinking Errors, Drill (2), Physical Training, Tobacco Recovery (2), Stages of Recovery, Bradshaw-On the Family, Parenting with Love and Logic, Keys to Loving Relationships (Saving Marriage), Parole Planning Core Values, Video Processing, Doo-Wop, Physical Training (2). A *2 indicates this class is attended in both Track A and in Track B. 

• Graduates who are released from prison after program graduation are referred to outpatient substance abuse treatment during parole.  Self-help meetings are encouraged after completing the program. Those offenders who are give a release date that does not allow an offender to graduate are recommended to complete intensive outpatient treatment (IOP) or residential treatment after prison release. Graduates are referred to general outpatient level treatment for their aftercare. This treatment is coordinated by the parole agent. 

HOPE/CARE at-a-glance 

• Inmates (called residents here) live in a dormitory-style housing atmosphere, bunking with inmates in their dorm in a team-building atmosphere.

• Principle and values-based Therapeutic Community designed as a positive, peer culture and environment where high standards of morals of "right living" and healthy values are reinforced with privileges, rewards, and recognition.

• Community-based change supported by therapists, program graduates, and other mentors or role models.

• Relapse prevention with an expectation of complete abstinence from abused substances. Recognition of elimination of criminal thinking and anti-social behaviors.

• Residents adhere to section rules related to pro-social behavior patterns (similar to society's expectations), adopted gradually. For example: follow instructions, be punctual, maintain appropriate appearance, use proper manners. Residents hold one another accountable by "calling each other out" for behavior contrary to the program's standards. They offer constructive and assertive feedback and create a safe, predictable community allowing room for personal growth and recovery. Punishments often entail light-hearted, albeit embarrassing, performances in front of peers, as deemed fit by a council of fellow residents.

• No violence allowed. HOPE residents are carefully screened for participation based on their offense history, programming needs, and suitability for dorm-style living. Residents with mental-health diagnoses are treated to maintain remission of symptoms.

• Each resident is expected to participate in classes as well as group and individual therapy offered by staff. 

• Residents are expected to be the best-behaved and hardest working in the institution. They complete an intensive track (two 2-month stages), and then are invited to go to school (high school/vocational trades) or work in prison jobs. In order to apply for jobs, residents must have completed the intensive phase and hold a "step three" position in HOPE (corresponding with the number of assignments completed).

• The first four months of classes are the "intensive tracks." These courses are taught by residents further along in the program and include: Relapse prevention, interpersonal skills, AA 12-step, anger management, stress management, cognitive restructuring (thinking errors), saving marriage, parenting, relationship building, core values, games, stages of recovery, physical training, family, conflict resolution, and parole planning.

• Residents are referred to outpatient substance abuse treatment and self-help meetings after leaving the program. For those who participate for a period short of one year and do not graduate, they receive a certificate of participation and will be referred to intensive outpatient treatment or residential treatment. Graduates are referred to aftercare only. This treatment is coordinated through parole officers.

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